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Harley Reno's Fly Fisher Worm

Mar 01 2012

 

Published by Bob Bates
Federation of Fly Fishers - Washington Council

Click Here to Download PDF version

Opening Comments

Some anglers catch a lot of fish with plastic worms.  The fish are mostly bass which grow big in the warmer parts of the world.  Harley Reno asked: “Why should they have all the fun?”  Then he set about designing a worm that fly fishers could tolerate.  He was demonstrating the design at the 2011 FFF International Fly Fishing Fair in West Yellowstone, Montana.  This one was 8 inches long, and he has caught bass and brown trout with it.  Harley’s design can be tied 12 inches in length.  However, when I showed the flies to a reformed metal and plastic tosser he said: “Too long! It is better if it is only 4 inches long.”  That small to me sounds like a leech.  So use your own judgment and build something you like and then test it.  Even in the northern part of the U.S. there are some good bass lakes.  You might get some hints on fishing it from the spin anglers.  

Materials list

Hook:  3366a size 1or 2

Thread:  Monochord 3/0 Danville

Body:  Ultra chenille any color you like.

Bead: glass 4/0 and 6/0

Step 1

Start thread at bend and wind forward to eye.

 Step 1

Step 2

Put beads on bobbin threader, and slide them up the thin wire to get them out of the way. Slide the ultra chenille on bobbin threader to hold it in place.  Then slide the beads down the bobbin threader to start them on the ultra chenille.

Step 2

Step 3

 

Slip beads about 1/4 of the way down the ultra chenille.  Then slide hook through beads without hooking the ultra chenille.

Step 4

Slide the beads along hook so they are together in front of bend. 

Step 4

Step 5

Anchor beads.  Put some thread wraps between each bead.  You are simulating the Clitella or sex gland of the worm.

Step 5

Step 6

Put a Snell on the hook with a Palomer knot which is the strongest knot to attach leader to hook.

Step 6

Step 7

Put a weed guard on.  Use natural shape of monofilament.  Pinch over hook.  Select the nylon strength to the fishing conditions.  A lake in Florida with lots of brush use 50 pound.  Just some weeds 30 lb; gravel bottom 20 lb.  With San Juan worm no weed guard.  Use a figure eight knot that pulls equally in both directions.

Step 7

Step 8

At some point need to taper the ends of the ultra chenille.  The best way to do it is to quickly put the end into the center of a flame and pull it out.  If you bring the chenille close to the side of the flame a lopsided end will result. 

 Step 8

Step 9

Slip a smaller bead onto a bobbin threader, slip the snell through the bead, hook the ultra chenille onto the threader and slip the bead on to the ultra chenille.  To keep bead in place use a little superglue.  Then tie a loop in the snell nylon.  Go fishing. 

Step 9 

Closing Comments

Since Harley is a retired biology professor he talked about worms and fish and how fish can paralyze the worm with three taps to damage the Clitella.  You don’t need to be shy about discussing worms with other fly anglers.  Just make sure they know it is tied with ultra chenille.

 Please Credit FFF Website or FFF Clubwire with any use of the pattern.

You can direct any questions or comments to FOM at flyofthemonth@fedflyfishers.org.

 

 

 

 

 

Published by Bob Bates
Federation of Fly Fishers - Washington Council

Click Here to Download PDF version

Opening Comments

Some anglers catch a lot of fish with plastic worms.  The fish are mostly bass which grow big in the warmer parts of the world.  Harley Reno asked: “Why should they have all the fun?”  Then he set about designing a worm that fly fishers could tolerate.  He was demonstrating the design at the 2011 FFF International Fly Fishing Fair in West Yellowstone, Montana.  This one was 8 inches long, and he has caught bass and brown trout with it.  Harley’s design can be tied 12 inches in length.  However, when I showed the flies to a reformed metal and plastic tosser he said: “Too long! It is better if it is only 4 inches long.”  That small to me sounds like a leech.  So use your own judgment and build something you like and then test it.  Even in the northern part of the U.S. there are some good bass lakes.  You might get some hints on fishing it from the spin anglers.  

Materials list

Hook:  3366a size 1or 2

Thread:  Monochord 3/0 Danville

Body:  Ultra chenille any color you like.

Bead: glass 4/0 and 6/0

Step 1

Start thread at bend and wind forward to eye.

 

Step 2

Put beads on bobbin threader, and slide them up the thin wire to get them out of the way. Slide the ultra chenille on bobbin threader to hold it in place.  Then slide the beads down the bobbin threader to start them on the ultra chenille.

 

Step 3

 

Slip beads about 1/4 of the way down the ultra chenille.  Then slide hook through beads without hooking the ultra chenille.

 

Step 4

Slide the beads along hook so they are together in front of bend. 

 

Step 5

Anchor beads.  Put some thread wraps between each bead.  You are simulating the Clitella or sex gland of the worm.

 

Step 6

Put a Snell on the hook with a Palomer knot which is the strongest knot to attach leader to hook.

 

Step 7

Put a weed guard on.  Use natural shape of monofilament.  Pinch over hook.  Select the nylon strength to the fishing conditions.  A lake in Florida with lots of brush use 50 pound.  Just some weeds 30 lb; gravel bottom 20 lb.  With San Juan worm no weed guard.  Use a figure eight knot that pulls equally in both directions.

 

Step 8

At some point need to taper the ends of the ultra chenille.  The best way to do it is to quickly put the end into the center of a flame and pull it out.  If you bring the chenille close to the side of the flame a lopsided end will result. 

 

Step 9

Slip a smaller bead onto a bobbin threader, slip the snell through the bead, hook the ultra chenille onto the threader and slip the bead on to the ultra chenille.  To keep bead in place use a little superglue.  Then tie a loop in the snell nylon.  Go fishing. 

 

Closing Comments

Since Harley is a retired biology professor he talked about worms and fish and how fish can paralyze the worm with three taps to damage the Clitella.  You don’t need to be shy about discussing worms with other fly anglers.  Just make sure they know it is tied with ultra chenille.

 Please Credit FFF Website or FFF Clubwire with any use of the pattern.

You can direct any questions or comments to FOM at flyofthemonth@fedflyfishers.org.

 

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